Archive for the ‘e-books’ category

From the WSJ-The ABCs of E-Reading

08/26/2010

This is from yesterday’s Wall Street Journal. The gist is that most people with an e-reader (I have a Kindle) read more or are least buying more books. That is certainly true for me. I’m still buying books that I want to own, that I want to treasure and keep on my bookshelf, in “book” form, but for books that I want to read for simple pleasure, I’m buying on my Kindle. For instance, I write historical fiction/romance/mystery and so I’ve been going through a frenzy of reading similar books. Books that I probably would never have purchased new. We have a great used bookstore in our neighborhood and I could go and stock up there, but I’m talking a lot of books. I’ve probably read 15-20 romance/mysteries in the last two months and they won’t all fit next to my bed and they’re certainly not keepsake material, so it makes sense to read them on the Kindle.

Anyway, here’s the article: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703846604575448093175758872.html?mod=WSJ_Books_LS_Books_2

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The Magic of Instant Gratification: My Kindle and Me

07/20/2010

Yesterday I read the New York Times’ piece about Amazon’s Kindle sales v. hardcover sales. I put a link here on our blog and and “tweeted” the link. I think the numbers speak for themselves–people want to read. And ultimately, they don’t care if it’s on paper, on an audio cd, on an electronic device or sewn together in a parchment codex or rolled up in a papryi scroll. A good story will be read. I believe the medium is important, but, ultimately, it is the message that matters.

The story is the product. The author is the creator. The editor is the polisher. The publisher is the packager. And while I love book cover design and I love to hold books, I love to READ them more.

As an aspiring novelist and brand new publisher, I hope someday to make money from the creation and sales of books. And as an avid reader who places a high value on the experience of reading a well written novel that transports me somewhere new and exciting or that opens doors to new ideas and teaches me something extraordinary, I am willing to pay a fair price for a book no matter what the format. Hardcover, paperback, audio, e-book…it doesn’t matter. The creative team should be fairly compensated for the work they produced.

Before the ebook, I was content, as my hubby still is, to read reviews, make lists of books to read, browse book shelves and get recommendations from friends and book clubs. However, being an immediate gratification type of gal, I also had been known to read a review and then get in my car and actually go buy the book right then and there. It didn’t matter if it was just out and still in hardback. If I wanted to read it–no, needed to read it–I would go get it and start reading. Immediately. That day.

The Kindle was a dream come true for me. Although I love to hold books and underline passages and write in the margins and dog ear pages, I, basically, want to read. I want to get to that first line and read all the way through to the last. Although I love a well-turned phrase and get all warm and fuzzy over beautifully constructed sentences, I ultimately read for character and story. I get so engrossed I will laugh out loud and bawl my eyes out. It is a common occurance for me to start a book when I go to bed and finish it by breakfast.

So, when I get in the mood for a book, I want to dive in. But what if there is no Kindle version?  I’ve gotten used to my instant gratification and I get aggravated (okay, angry) when there is no e-version for me to dive right into, so to speak. Why would a publisher delay release of an e-book, or a paperback, for that matter?  Because the publisher or the author wants me to buy the hardcover. Book clubs routinely postpone tackling a book because it is in hardcover. They wait until the paperback is released. Now, some publishers are doing the same for e-books. If I really, really, really wanted to read the book, I could buy the hardcover–and, as I said, I’ve often done that to my hubby’s chagrin. (I’m Ms. instant gratification makes me happy, he’s Mr. delayed gratification is even sweeter.) Or I could go to the library and check it out and not spend the money. But the fundamental question is: why should I have to? Why make the customer pay more or work harder to get their hands on your product? Especially now when it is so easy to deliver it wirelessly? Poof in 15 seconds I could have the book I want and start in on my next adventure.

For instance,  a couple of days ago I read a review of a book called The Messenger of Athens: A Novel by Anne Zouroudi. It’s a modern-day murder mystery set in the Greek Isles. Since I had just finished a book and since I’m writing a murder mystery set in Greece (albeit in 440 BCE), I wanted to read it. I went to Amazon to buy it for my Kindle and it wasn’t due to be released until July 19. It’s only a couple of days aways, I thought, I can wait. So I preordered it. Once the book was released, it would automatically appear on my Kindle the next time I turned it on to synch. And sure enough, I turned on my Kindle last night, July 19, hit the synch button and there it was. I started reading immediately, a happy customer.

And, as an added bonus, no trees were killed in the making of my e-book , no delivery trucks chugged out CO2 to get my book to me, and I didn’t have to get in the car and drive to the local bookstore. Don’t get me wrong, I know there are costs involved to mining the minerals and manufacturing an e-reader. But still, laying in bed, all snuggled up and ready for an adventure, pressing a tiny little button and having my adventure appear before my eyes, was like magic.

And isn’t that what reading is all about?

– Kristina

Amazon sells more e-books than hardcovers

07/19/2010

According to the New York Times, Amazon announced that during the last three months e-books for the Kindle outsold hardbacks. Read the full story here: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/20/technology/20kindle.html?hp


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